🇩🇪🇬🇧

Information events

Before the start of the semester, a preliminary course and an information event will be held for our Bachelor first-year students, to which we cordially invite you. For more information on the dates, please refer to the invitation.


Start of studies, duration of studies, prerequisites

The standard period of study is 6 semesters. The curricula are designed for the start of studies in a winter semester. It is also possible to begin studies in the summer semester; in this case, you should contact the student advisory service in order to make it easier to get into the program.

There are no formal prerequisites for admission to a Bachelor's program other than a university entrance qualification. Previous knowledge of mathematics, such as is only taught in advanced courses at the upper level of a Gymnasium, is useful but not absolutely necessary for admission to the Bachelor's program.


Structure of the Bachelor's program

The study program is divided into:

  • Compulsory area
  • General professional courses
  • Specialization area
  • Application area

The examinations take place during the course of study.

In the compulsory area, you will acquire the necessary knowledge to deal with mathematics as a science and its application in practice, in particular also involving computers. To this end, courses are held in analysis, linear algebra, computer-oriented mathematics, algebra, geometry, stochastics, numerical mathematics and discrete mathematics.

In the in-depth phase of the program, which begins in the fourth semester, students acquire in-depth knowledge in sub-areas of their own choice. The ability is learned to independently acquire further knowledge and skills in professional life or in subsequent higher qualifications. In the in-depth phase, you can set focal points through a combination of modules that complement each other in terms of content. The program is completed with the bachelor's thesis, in which a topic from the area of specialization is to be worked on independently using scientific methods within a specified period of time (9 weeks) under supervision.

In general career-preparing courses, you will acquire skills and knowledge useful for scientific qualification beyond the specialized studies. These include courses on communication as well as optionally taking over a tutorial or completing a professional internship.

The Bachelor's program includes the study of an application subject. The following application subjects are available:

  • Business Administration
  • Economics
  • Financial Economics (Finance)
  • Computer Science
  • Experimental Physics
  • Theoretical Physics
  • Earth Sciences
  • Life Sciences
  • Chemistry
  • Meteorology

Other applied subjects may be approved upon request.

The current version of the Bachelor's Regulations can be found on the pages of the Examination Office for the Bachelor's-Master's Program in Mathematics.


Profile and professional field of the Bachelor's program

In the Bachelor's program, students acquire:

  • basic mathematical knowledge in pure and applied mathematics,
  • the basic ability to work scientifically,
  • methodological competence in a self-selected area of mathematics,
  • basic knowledge for the inclusion of computers and electronic media in the implementation or representation of modeling steps,
  • the ability to solve a more extensive mathematical problem in a bachelor thesis,
  • Communication skill

Information events


Start of studies, duration of studies, prerequisites

The standard period of study is 4 semesters. The curricula are designed for the start of studies in a winter semester. It is also possible to start the program in the summer semester; in this case, you should contact the student advisory service in order to make it easier for you to start the program.

The formal requirement is a Bachelor's degree in mathematics or a degree equivalent to a Bachelor's degree in mathematics in another field of study. A good knowledge of English is important, as almost all contributions in mathematical research are published in English.


Structure,profile and professional relevance of the Master's program

The master's program is divided into four areas:

  • Major
  • Professionalization area
  • Application subject
  • Master thesis

The examinations take place during the course of study.

In the major field of study, students receive in-depth mathematical training and specialize in one area of mathematics.

In the Master's thesis, a topic from the chosen area of specialization is to be worked out independently within a specified period of time (6 months) and presented in a form that meets scientific standard

In the application subject, an in-depth examination takes place in a subject area in which mathematical methods have a prominent position. In this way, the specialization in the focus area can be strengthened and supplemented. The following application subjects can be chosen:

  • Business Administration
  • Economics
  • Financial Economics (Finance)
  • Computer Science
  • Experimental / Theoretical Physics
  • Earth Sciences
  • Life Sciences
  • Chemistry
  • Meteorology

Additional applied subjects may be approved upon application.

The current version of the Master's Program Regulations can be found on the pages of the Examination Office for the Bachelor's-Master's Program in Mathematics.
 
The professionalization is intended to assist in the preparation for independent mathematical work in business and industry or as a scientist at a university. This is done within the framework of a tutorial, a course "Guidance for scientific work" as well as a course with references from mathematics to computer science, natural sciences or other sciences.
 
 
Intended professional qualification of the master graduates
 
In the Bachelor's program, students acquire:

  • basic mathematical knowledge in pure and applied mathematics,
  • the basic ability to work scientifically,
  • methodological competence in a self-selected area of mathematics,
  • basic knowledge for the inclusion of computers and electronic media in the implementation or representation of modeling steps,
  • the ability to solve a more extensive mathematical problem in a bachelor thesis,
  • Communication skills


The teacher training program in mathematics qualifies students to teach mathematics at one of the Hessian school types. The Institute of Mathematics is significantly involved in the teacher training courses:


  • L1 (Elementary School)
  • L2 (Hauptschule and Realschule)
  • L5 (special school)
  • L3 (grammar school)

The study programs consist of subject-specific and subject-specific didactic parts. In both parts, the study program contains a compulsory and an elective part.

Among the teacher training programs, the subject-specific part is largest in the L3 program. In this program, each student chooses two subjects. The standard duration of the program is nine semesters, including the semester of examinations.

If they choose mathematics as their subject, L3 students take the courses Linear Algebra, Fundamentals of Algebra, Geometry, Analysis 1 in the first three semesters. These courses are offered jointly for the Bachelor of Mathematics and the L3 Mathematics teacher training programs. Due to these joint courses, there is an extensive permeability between the Bachelor's and the L3 studies in the first year of study, which enables the students to reorient themselves between these degrees without any loss of time, if necessary.

Further links

Mathematics is both a cultural science with a long tradition and the driving force behind many modern technologies, making it a key discipline of the information age. On the one hand, mathematics aims to understand abstract structures and their interrelationships; on the other hand, it develops powerful methods to address questions and problems in numerous scientific disciplines.

Modern applications of mathematics are, for example, in the fields of data security and compression, traffic control, the valuation and optimization of financial instruments, or medical operation planning.

Prior knowledge, such as is only taught in advanced courses at the upper level of a Gymnasium, is not essential for taking up a mathematics degree. What you should certainly bring with you to study mathematics is curiosity, the joy of analyzing, structuring and solving problems, and a large portion of stamina.

The career prospects for graduates in mathematics are very good. Typical fields of work can be found in banks, insurance companies, in the software and IT industry, in management consultancies, in data processing or in research and development, and teachers of mathematics are also in high demand.


With a master's degree in mathematics, there is also the possibility of working as a doctoral candidate and/or research associate at a university.


Further information on job profiles for mathematicians can also be found at dmv.mathematik.de.

Mathematics already has a long tradition at Goethe University, established shortly after the university's founding by eminent mathematicians such as Max Dehn and Carl Ludwig Siegel. In the recent past, two prestigious ERC grants of the European Research Council were awarded to scientists of the Institute of Mathematics: Prof. Dr. Martin Möller (2010) and Prof. Dr. Amin Coja-Oghlan (2011).


Focal points

Special areas of expertise in Frankfurt are Algebra and Geometryanalysis and numerics, discrete mathematics, financial mathematics and stochastics.


Supervision

About 20 professors and more than 40 research assistants are available for the supervision of mathematics courses. The supervision ratio in Frankfurt is good, so that there is intensive personal contact between professors, staff and students.

The Mathematics Learning Center, which opened in 2008, supports first-year students with questions about the lectures and in working through the exercises, and also offers space to study alone or in groups.

Numerous basic lectures are also supplemented by an e-learning offering, which includes, for example, recording lectures on video and making them available online.

The following is a brief attempt to explain what students will encounter in a mathematics degree program. For a typical structure of the bachelor's program and detailed descriptions, it is advisable to consult the study regulations and take a look at the following page.


The mathematical part

The Bachelor's program with a standard period of study of six semesters consists primarily of the course types "Lecture", "(Pro-) Seminar" and "Exercise". One course "Exercise" belongs to one course "Lecture". For further forms of teaching and learning, please refer to the study regulations (§ 6). At this point, we will only explain the main types of events that occur in everyday study.

Lectures: Lectures are offered as "large" and "small" lectures with either twice 2 hours per week, respectively once 2 hours per week. As a rule, attendance is not compulsory in lectures. The study regulations (§ 6) define learning in lectures as:

"Lectures provide a coherent treatment of topics and convey an overview of a specific area of knowledge. Problems and methods of solution, theories, and examples are presented by instructors, demonstrating mathematical ways of looking at things and mathematical reasoning."

Accompanying a lecture are (weekly/bi-weekly) practice assignments, which you can think of a bit like "homework" in school. You will work on these individually, usually within a week, and hand them in. Your suggested solutions will be corrected by a "tutor" (usually a student in a higher semester) and you will receive individual feedback. Finally, the solutions will be presented in a small group, "tutorial". Attendance in the exercise groups is usually not formulated as compulsory, but highly recommended. The study regulations define exercises as follows:

"In the exercises, also called "tutorials", to a lecture, the students have to deal independently with tasks, which can usually be worked on with the aids of the lecture or the necessary prerequisites for it. The tasks are to be worked on individually, the solutions are to be formulated in writing and presented orally in the tutorials. Exercises take place in groups. In the tutorial hours, hints are given on the tasks, the solutions are discussed, and questions on the lecture material are also discussed."

In seminars and proseminars, students are expected to develop a mathematical topic and present it as a paper to other seminar participants. In these courses, you are usually expected to be present for all presentations.

As you can see, a large part of mathematics studies consists of self-study, which means, for example, working on exercises independently or preparing and following up lectures independently. The high degree of individual time management can be a challenge for first-year students. To illustrate this, you should take the following calculation example to heart, which can certainly only give an approximation of a realistic estimate.

According to the study plan, you should attend three lectures with exercises in the first semester for a total of 27 CP. One CP is calculated with up to 30 hours of working time. On a semester (6 months) this corresponds to 810 hours of work. Of these, you will spend a maximum of 18 hours, approximately 15 weeks, in attendance courses, leaving a very high proportion for self-study. In reality, of course, the workload varies significantly - but you should be aware when you start studying mathematics that much of the content can only be understood if you invest and want to invest sufficient time and effort yourself.


The application subject

The types of events and the typical sequence of events depends on the circumstances of the offering course of study. In the study regulations you will find the classic application subjects, others are possible upon request.


The "Communication" Module:

Essentially, students can choose between a company internship in a professional field common to mathematicians and the management of a tutorial (see above). For corresponding variants and modifications, please refer to the module "BaM-SK" in the study regulations.

You can find the Online Study Assistent here. In addition, you will find information on all study programs under OSA Overview.

This page is intended to help you find your way to the university as smoothly as possible. In addition to the general information about the university, your HRZ access data, the Goethe Card, etc., which you received / have received from the Study Service Centre, there are some events specifically for the mathematics degree programme which are not compulsory, but are highly recommended.

👩🏼🎓

Course description

The course is aimed at students of mathematics (B.Sc. and teaching degree) who have no experience with university mathematics. In this course we want to introduce some basic concepts of mathematics that you will encounter in the lectures of the first semester and talk about different principles of proof. We will consolidate what we have learned by means of many exercises, which will be supervised by tutors from higher semesters. In addition, we will discuss various methodological aspects of mathematics studies, e.g. "How do I (effectively) read a mathematical text?" or "How do I approach an exercise?". 

The course will take place in presence. 


Schedule

Time: Monday, 10.10.2022 - Friday, 14.10.2022
Venue: Lecture hall building, Campus Bockenheim, Gräfstraße 50-54, 60325 Frankfurt, Germany 
Room: Lecture: H8 (10:15 - 11:45), Exercises: H8 & H11 (13:15-14:45)

 

Monday     

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday

Friday 

10:15 - 11:45 

Lecture 1

Lecture 2

Lecture 3

Lecture 4

Lecture 5

11:45 - 13:15 

Lunch break

Lunch break

Lunch break

Lunch break

Lunch break

13:15 - 14:45 Practice time

Practice time

Practice time

Practice time

Practice time

14:45 - 15:45 

Presentation of exercises

Presentation of exercises

Presentation of exercises

Presentation of exercises

Presentation of exercises

Evening Program Social evening in the K-Room
Barbecue


Literature

This course largely follows the script by Theresa Kumpitsch from previous semesters. This in turn follows the preliminary course by Sven Jarohs (script) as well as Kerstin Hesse's Introduction to Mathematical Thinking and Working, the Introduction to Mathematical Working by Hermann Schichl and Roland Steinbauer and the Introduction to Mathematical Thinking and Working -- tutorial and transparent by Joachim Hilgert, Max Hoffmann and Anja Panse.

Neither in this course nor in the preliminary courses linked above is school material refreshed. The university's Online Mathematics Bridge Course (OMB+) is a good place to start. Please note that this bridge course is not a preparation for the study of mathematics.

The mathematics department offers an orientation event by students for students. The above-mentioned preliminary course is suitably embedded in this orientation event. The orientation event also usually takes place over approximately 7 days in the two weeks before lectures begin. In the summer semester, this time may vary slightly due to the Easter holidays. Participation in the orientation event is voluntary, but students report that it helps them get off to a good start. Among other things, you will receive information from students about what your everyday study life will be like and how you can create your individual timetable, for example.

Furthermore, there is an orientation session of approximately two hours, during which you will be welcomed by the Dean of Studies of Mathematics. In this welcome session, the structure of the degree programme will be explained to you, and the examination and study regulations will be discussed. This lecture will also be integrated into the programme of the Mathematics Student Council.

You will receive information and an invitation to the orientation event of the Mathematics Student Council on the corresponding homepage. Please register for this event on the corresponding homepage.

As you can see from the study regulations, it is suggested for the first semester that you attend the courses "Introduction to Computer-Oriented Mathematics", "Analysis 1" and "Linear Algebra". Please refer to the course catalogue for times and information. If you have problems with the operation of the course catalogue, you can clarify them in the orientation event (see above). You don't have to worry because you don't have to register in advance for the courses in the first semester. Registration for the exercise groups will be explained to you in the respective first lecture.

What you should be aware of in the first semester is that you have to register once for the "Bachelor examination" at the examination office. Therefore, please read at least the frequently asked questions on the page of the examination office. The information on registering for the Bachelor's examination can be found under point 4.

Excerpt from the study regulations (§ 5 (2)): "As a rule, the Bachelor's programme should be started in the winter semester. It is possible to start in the summer semester, but there may be shifts in the study plan." We recommend that you contact the student advisory service if you are unsure about how to begin your studies.

The subject-specific academic counselling is aimed at prospective students, students in the introductory phase of their studies, students in part-time studies as well as the specialisation counselling. The Central Student Advisory Service is also available for further concerns.

During your mathematics studies at Goethe University, you have the opportunity to study one or more semesters at a foreign university. For European countries, the ERASMUS programme provides the framework as well as financial and organisational support for your stay abroad. There are also programmes for stays in non-European countries that provide you with organisational support and financial assistance. You can find further information at International Office of the Goethe-University.


Subject Advisory Service
Dr. Sven Jarohs Study Coordinator and Counselling for the Initial Study Phase
Prof. Dr. Alex Küronya
Algebra und Geometry
Aenne Benjes
Discrete Mathematics
Andrej Brojatsch
Numerics
Prof. Dr. Andreas Bernig Analysis
Prof. Dr. Christoph Kühn
Financial Mathematics
Prof. Dr. Ralph Neininger
Stochastics
    
BAföG
Prof. Dr. Martin Möller BAföG Officer
Matthias Colmar Processing, Examination of BAfög Applications
   
Semester abroad
apl. Prof. Gabi Schneider Erasmus Officer 
Prof. Dr. Alex Küronya Internationalisation Officer

Information events

Before the start of the semester, a preliminary course and an information event will be held for our Bachelor first-year students, to which we cordially invite you. For more information on the dates, please refer to the invitation.


Start of studies, duration of studies, prerequisites

The standard period of study is 6 semesters. The curricula are designed for the start of studies in a winter semester. It is also possible to begin studies in the summer semester; in this case, you should contact the student advisory service in order to make it easier to get into the program.

There are no formal prerequisites for admission to a Bachelor's program other than a university entrance qualification. Previous knowledge of mathematics, such as is only taught in advanced courses at the upper level of a Gymnasium, is useful but not absolutely necessary for admission to the Bachelor's program.


Structure of the Bachelor's program

The study program is divided into:

  • Compulsory area
  • General professional courses
  • Specialization area
  • Application area

The examinations take place during the course of study.

In the compulsory area, you will acquire the necessary knowledge to deal with mathematics as a science and its application in practice, in particular also involving computers. To this end, courses are held in analysis, linear algebra, computer-oriented mathematics, algebra, geometry, stochastics, numerical mathematics and discrete mathematics.

In the in-depth phase of the program, which begins in the fourth semester, students acquire in-depth knowledge in sub-areas of their own choice. The ability is learned to independently acquire further knowledge and skills in professional life or in subsequent higher qualifications. In the in-depth phase, you can set focal points through a combination of modules that complement each other in terms of content. The program is completed with the bachelor's thesis, in which a topic from the area of specialization is to be worked on independently using scientific methods within a specified period of time (9 weeks) under supervision.

In general career-preparing courses, you will acquire skills and knowledge useful for scientific qualification beyond the specialized studies. These include courses on communication as well as optionally taking over a tutorial or completing a professional internship.

The Bachelor's program includes the study of an application subject. The following application subjects are available:

  • Business Administration
  • Economics
  • Financial Economics (Finance)
  • Computer Science
  • Experimental Physics
  • Theoretical Physics
  • Earth Sciences
  • Life Sciences
  • Chemistry
  • Meteorology

Other applied subjects may be approved upon request.

The current version of the Bachelor's Regulations can be found on the pages of the Examination Office for the Bachelor's-Master's Program in Mathematics.


Profile and professional field of the Bachelor's program

In the Bachelor's program, students acquire:

  • basic mathematical knowledge in pure and applied mathematics,
  • the basic ability to work scientifically,
  • methodological competence in a self-selected area of mathematics,
  • basic knowledge for the inclusion of computers and electronic media in the implementation or representation of modeling steps,
  • the ability to solve a more extensive mathematical problem in a bachelor thesis,
  • Communication skill

Information events


Start of studies, duration of studies, prerequisites

The standard period of study is 4 semesters. The curricula are designed for the start of studies in a winter semester. It is also possible to start the program in the summer semester; in this case, you should contact the student advisory service in order to make it easier for you to start the program.

The formal requirement is a Bachelor's degree in mathematics or a degree equivalent to a Bachelor's degree in mathematics in another field of study. A good knowledge of English is important, as almost all contributions in mathematical research are published in English.


Structure,profile and professional relevance of the Master's program

The master's program is divided into four areas:

  • Major
  • Professionalization area
  • Application subject
  • Master thesis

The examinations take place during the course of study.

In the major field of study, students receive in-depth mathematical training and specialize in one area of mathematics.

In the Master's thesis, a topic from the chosen area of specialization is to be worked out independently within a specified period of time (6 months) and presented in a form that meets scientific standard

In the application subject, an in-depth examination takes place in a subject area in which mathematical methods have a prominent position. In this way, the specialization in the focus area can be strengthened and supplemented. The following application subjects can be chosen:

  • Business Administration
  • Economics
  • Financial Economics (Finance)
  • Computer Science
  • Experimental / Theoretical Physics
  • Earth Sciences
  • Life Sciences
  • Chemistry
  • Meteorology

Additional applied subjects may be approved upon application.

The current version of the Master's Program Regulations can be found on the pages of the Examination Office for the Bachelor's-Master's Program in Mathematics.
 
The professionalization is intended to assist in the preparation for independent mathematical work in business and industry or as a scientist at a university. This is done within the framework of a tutorial, a course "Guidance for scientific work" as well as a course with references from mathematics to computer science, natural sciences or other sciences.
 
 
Intended professional qualification of the master graduates
 
In the Bachelor's program, students acquire:

  • basic mathematical knowledge in pure and applied mathematics,
  • the basic ability to work scientifically,
  • methodological competence in a self-selected area of mathematics,
  • basic knowledge for the inclusion of computers and electronic media in the implementation or representation of modeling steps,
  • the ability to solve a more extensive mathematical problem in a bachelor thesis,
  • Communication skills


The teacher training program in mathematics qualifies students to teach mathematics at one of the Hessian school types. The Institute of Mathematics is significantly involved in the teacher training courses:


  • L1 (Elementary School)
  • L2 (Hauptschule and Realschule)
  • L5 (special school)
  • L3 (grammar school)

The study programs consist of subject-specific and subject-specific didactic parts. In both parts, the study program contains a compulsory and an elective part.

Among the teacher training programs, the subject-specific part is largest in the L3 program. In this program, each student chooses two subjects. The standard duration of the program is nine semesters, including the semester of examinations.

If they choose mathematics as their subject, L3 students take the courses Linear Algebra, Fundamentals of Algebra, Geometry, Analysis 1 in the first three semesters. These courses are offered jointly for the Bachelor of Mathematics and the L3 Mathematics teacher training programs. Due to these joint courses, there is an extensive permeability between the Bachelor's and the L3 studies in the first year of study, which enables the students to reorient themselves between these degrees without any loss of time, if necessary.

Further links

Mathematics is both a cultural science with a long tradition and the driving force behind many modern technologies, making it a key discipline of the information age. On the one hand, mathematics aims to understand abstract structures and their interrelationships; on the other hand, it develops powerful methods to address questions and problems in numerous scientific disciplines.

Modern applications of mathematics are, for example, in the fields of data security and compression, traffic control, the valuation and optimization of financial instruments, or medical operation planning.

Prior knowledge, such as is only taught in advanced courses at the upper level of a Gymnasium, is not essential for taking up a mathematics degree. What you should certainly bring with you to study mathematics is curiosity, the joy of analyzing, structuring and solving problems, and a large portion of stamina.

The career prospects for graduates in mathematics are very good. Typical fields of work can be found in banks, insurance companies, in the software and IT industry, in management consultancies, in data processing or in research and development, and teachers of mathematics are also in high demand.


With a master's degree in mathematics, there is also the possibility of working as a doctoral candidate and/or research associate at a university.


Further information on job profiles for mathematicians can also be found at dmv.mathematik.de.

Mathematics already has a long tradition at Goethe University, established shortly after the university's founding by eminent mathematicians such as Max Dehn and Carl Ludwig Siegel. In the recent past, two prestigious ERC grants of the European Research Council were awarded to scientists of the Institute of Mathematics: Prof. Dr. Martin Möller (2010) and Prof. Dr. Amin Coja-Oghlan (2011).


Focal points

Special areas of expertise in Frankfurt are Algebra and Geometryanalysis and numerics, discrete mathematics, financial mathematics and stochastics.


Supervision

About 20 professors and more than 40 research assistants are available for the supervision of mathematics courses. The supervision ratio in Frankfurt is good, so that there is intensive personal contact between professors, staff and students.

The Mathematics Learning Center, which opened in 2008, supports first-year students with questions about the lectures and in working through the exercises, and also offers space to study alone or in groups.

Numerous basic lectures are also supplemented by an e-learning offering, which includes, for example, recording lectures on video and making them available online.

The following is a brief attempt to explain what students will encounter in a mathematics degree program. For a typical structure of the bachelor's program and detailed descriptions, it is advisable to consult the study regulations and take a look at the following page.


The mathematical part

The Bachelor's program with a standard period of study of six semesters consists primarily of the course types "Lecture", "(Pro-) Seminar" and "Exercise". One course "Exercise" belongs to one course "Lecture". For further forms of teaching and learning, please refer to the study regulations (§ 6). At this point, we will only explain the main types of events that occur in everyday study.

Lectures: Lectures are offered as "large" and "small" lectures with either twice 2 hours per week, respectively once 2 hours per week. As a rule, attendance is not compulsory in lectures. The study regulations (§ 6) define learning in lectures as:

"Lectures provide a coherent treatment of topics and convey an overview of a specific area of knowledge. Problems and methods of solution, theories, and examples are presented by instructors, demonstrating mathematical ways of looking at things and mathematical reasoning."

Accompanying a lecture are (weekly/bi-weekly) practice assignments, which you can think of a bit like "homework" in school. You will work on these individually, usually within a week, and hand them in. Your suggested solutions will be corrected by a "tutor" (usually a student in a higher semester) and you will receive individual feedback. Finally, the solutions will be presented in a small group, "tutorial". Attendance in the exercise groups is usually not formulated as compulsory, but highly recommended. The study regulations define exercises as follows:

"In the exercises, also called "tutorials", to a lecture, the students have to deal independently with tasks, which can usually be worked on with the aids of the lecture or the necessary prerequisites for it. The tasks are to be worked on individually, the solutions are to be formulated in writing and presented orally in the tutorials. Exercises take place in groups. In the tutorial hours, hints are given on the tasks, the solutions are discussed, and questions on the lecture material are also discussed."

In seminars and proseminars, students are expected to develop a mathematical topic and present it as a paper to other seminar participants. In these courses, you are usually expected to be present for all presentations.

As you can see, a large part of mathematics studies consists of self-study, which means, for example, working on exercises independently or preparing and following up lectures independently. The high degree of individual time management can be a challenge for first-year students. To illustrate this, you should take the following calculation example to heart, which can certainly only give an approximation of a realistic estimate.

According to the study plan, you should attend three lectures with exercises in the first semester for a total of 27 CP. One CP is calculated with up to 30 hours of working time. On a semester (6 months) this corresponds to 810 hours of work. Of these, you will spend a maximum of 18 hours, approximately 15 weeks, in attendance courses, leaving a very high proportion for self-study. In reality, of course, the workload varies significantly - but you should be aware when you start studying mathematics that much of the content can only be understood if you invest and want to invest sufficient time and effort yourself.


The application subject

The types of events and the typical sequence of events depends on the circumstances of the offering course of study. In the study regulations you will find the classic application subjects, others are possible upon request.


The "Communication" Module:

Essentially, students can choose between a company internship in a professional field common to mathematicians and the management of a tutorial (see above). For corresponding variants and modifications, please refer to the module "BaM-SK" in the study regulations.

You can find the Online Study Assistent here. In addition, you will find information on all study programs under OSA Overview.

This page is intended to help you find your way to the university as smoothly as possible. In addition to the general information about the university, your HRZ access data, the Goethe Card, etc., which you received / have received from the Study Service Centre, there are some events specifically for the mathematics degree programme which are not compulsory, but are highly recommended.

👩🏼🎓

Course description

The course is aimed at students of mathematics (B.Sc. and teaching degree) who have no experience with university mathematics. In this course we want to introduce some basic concepts of mathematics that you will encounter in the lectures of the first semester and talk about different principles of proof. We will consolidate what we have learned by means of many exercises, which will be supervised by tutors from higher semesters. In addition, we will discuss various methodological aspects of mathematics studies, e.g. "How do I (effectively) read a mathematical text?" or "How do I approach an exercise?". 

The course will take place in presence. 


Schedule

Time: Monday, 10.10.2022 - Friday, 14.10.2022
Venue: Lecture hall building, Campus Bockenheim, Gräfstraße 50-54, 60325 Frankfurt, Germany 
Room: Lecture: H8 (10:15 - 11:45), Exercises: H8 & H11 (13:15-14:45)

 

Monday     

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday

Friday 

10:15 - 11:45 

Lecture 1

Lecture 2

Lecture 3

Lecture 4

Lecture 5

11:45 - 13:15 

Lunch break

Lunch break

Lunch break

Lunch break

Lunch break

13:15 - 14:45 Practice time

Practice time

Practice time

Practice time

Practice time

14:45 - 15:45 

Presentation of exercises

Presentation of exercises

Presentation of exercises

Presentation of exercises

Presentation of exercises

Evening Program Social evening in the K-Room
Barbecue


Literature

This course largely follows the script by Theresa Kumpitsch from previous semesters. This in turn follows the preliminary course by Sven Jarohs (script) as well as Kerstin Hesse's Introduction to Mathematical Thinking and Working, the Introduction to Mathematical Working by Hermann Schichl and Roland Steinbauer and the Introduction to Mathematical Thinking and Working -- tutorial and transparent by Joachim Hilgert, Max Hoffmann and Anja Panse.

Neither in this course nor in the preliminary courses linked above is school material refreshed. The university's Online Mathematics Bridge Course (OMB+) is a good place to start. Please note that this bridge course is not a preparation for the study of mathematics.

The mathematics department offers an orientation event by students for students. The above-mentioned preliminary course is suitably embedded in this orientation event. The orientation event also usually takes place over approximately 7 days in the two weeks before lectures begin. In the summer semester, this time may vary slightly due to the Easter holidays. Participation in the orientation event is voluntary, but students report that it helps them get off to a good start. Among other things, you will receive information from students about what your everyday study life will be like and how you can create your individual timetable, for example.

Furthermore, there is an orientation session of approximately two hours, during which you will be welcomed by the Dean of Studies of Mathematics. In this welcome session, the structure of the degree programme will be explained to you, and the examination and study regulations will be discussed. This lecture will also be integrated into the programme of the Mathematics Student Council.

You will receive information and an invitation to the orientation event of the Mathematics Student Council on the corresponding homepage. Please register for this event on the corresponding homepage.

As you can see from the study regulations, it is suggested for the first semester that you attend the courses "Introduction to Computer-Oriented Mathematics", "Analysis 1" and "Linear Algebra". Please refer to the course catalogue for times and information. If you have problems with the operation of the course catalogue, you can clarify them in the orientation event (see above). You don't have to worry because you don't have to register in advance for the courses in the first semester. Registration for the exercise groups will be explained to you in the respective first lecture.

What you should be aware of in the first semester is that you have to register once for the "Bachelor examination" at the examination office. Therefore, please read at least the frequently asked questions on the page of the examination office. The information on registering for the Bachelor's examination can be found under point 4.

Excerpt from the study regulations (§ 5 (2)): "As a rule, the Bachelor's programme should be started in the winter semester. It is possible to start in the summer semester, but there may be shifts in the study plan." We recommend that you contact the student advisory service if you are unsure about how to begin your studies.

The subject-specific academic counselling is aimed at prospective students, students in the introductory phase of their studies, students in part-time studies as well as the specialisation counselling. The Central Student Advisory Service is also available for further concerns.

During your mathematics studies at Goethe University, you have the opportunity to study one or more semesters at a foreign university. For European countries, the ERASMUS programme provides the framework as well as financial and organisational support for your stay abroad. There are also programmes for stays in non-European countries that provide you with organisational support and financial assistance. You can find further information at International Office of the Goethe-University.


Subject Advisory Service
Dr. Sven Jarohs Study Coordinator and Counselling for the Initial Study Phase
Prof. Dr. Alex Küronya
Algebra und Geometry
Aenne Benjes
Discrete Mathematics
Andrej Brojatsch
Numerics
Prof. Dr. Andreas Bernig Analysis
Prof. Dr. Christoph Kühn
Financial Mathematics
Prof. Dr. Ralph Neininger
Stochastics
    
BAföG
Prof. Dr. Martin Möller BAföG Officer
Matthias Colmar Processing, Examination of BAfög Applications
   
Semester abroad
apl. Prof. Gabi Schneider Erasmus Officer 
Prof. Dr. Alex Küronya Internationalisation Officer


Postal adress
Institut für Mathematik
Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität
Postfach 111932, Fach 187
60054 Frankfurt

Home adress
Institut für Mathematik
Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität
Robert-Mayer-Str. 6-10
60325 Frankfurt

Office of Mathematics
Silke Schultz
Robert-Mayer-Str.10, EG, Raum 11
Tel.: 069/798-24602
E-Mail: buero@math.uni-frankfurt.de

Study Coordinator:
Dr. Sven Jarohs
Tel.: 069/798-23531
E-Mail: jarohs@math.uni-frankfurt.de