Institute for Molecular Bio Science

Research

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Research

There are currently eleven working groups at the Institute; they investigate a wide variety of molecular aspects of life. This research primarily focuses on microorganisms and plants. Membrane Biology is traditionally one of the strongest areas at the Institute. In this context, the focal point is the analysis of the structure and function of membrane-bound proteins, as well as their regulation and participation in intracellular signalling cascades. In the field of Biotechnology, work is being conducted on the development of microbial cell factories using both classical and recombinant methods to bring about overproduction of a range of enzymes and chemicals. Another new aspect of this field is the identification, characterisation and application of new metabolites from the secondary metabolism of entomopathogenic microbes. Metabolic pathways are selectively altered, e.g. to produce biofuels or to develop therapeutic methods of improving cellular defence.

In Microbial Physiology the emphasis is on metabolic physiology, specifically on its regulation and genetic basis in the Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. The results of this study form the basis of analysis by membrane biologists and biotechnologists, leading to close networking both within the faculty and beyond. Research topics in Molecular Plant Physiology are the energy metabolism of photosynthetic organisms and its underlying organelle interactions. Physiological, structural, biochemical and genetic investigation all play an important part in this research.

Degenerative Processes and Molecular Stress focuses on the investigation of molecular aging mechanisms, especially the role of mitochondria in the aging process, as well as the analysis of cellular responses to heat and light stress. The groups working on Protective Functions of Carotenoids are investigating the molecular mechanism of carotenoid function in strong light conditions, as well as in protection from reactive oxygen species and membrane damage caused by external factors. In the field of Regulatory RNAs, the research focuses on structural and functional analysis of regulatory non-coding RNAs and their interactions with proteins, as well as their biological functions and cellular regulation.

Research Objects

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Research Objects

Department     Title   First Name     Surname

Biology and Biotechnology of Fungi

   

Prof.

 

Richard

   

Splivallo

Biology and Genetics of Procaryotes

   

Prof.

 

Jörg

   

Soppa

Biosynthesis in Plants und Microorganism

   

Prof.

 

Gerhard

   

Sandmann

Merck-Stiftungsprofessur Molecular Biotechnology

   

Prof.

 

Helge

   

Bode

Molecular Developmental Biology

   

Prof.

 

Heinz Dieter

   

Osiewacz

Molecular Microbiology and Bioenergetics

   

Prof.

 

Volker 

   

Müller

Molecular Microbiology and Bioenergetics

   

Prof.

 

Beate

   

Averhoff

Molecular Cell Biology of Plants

   

Prof.

 

Enrico

   

Schleiff

mRNA-based gene regulation

   

Dr.

 

Andreas

   

Schlundt

Plant Cell Physiology

   

Prof.

 

Claudia

   

Büchel

Physiology and Genetics of Lower Eukaryotes

   

Prof.

 

Eckhard

   

Boles

RNA Structural Biology

   

Prof.

 

Jens

   

Wöhnert

Heads of the Departments

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Heads of the Departments

Title   First Name   Surname   Department  
               

Prof.

 

Beate

 

Averhoff

 

Molecular Microbiology and Bioenergetics

 

Prof.

 

Helge

 

Bode

 

Merck-Stiftungsprofessur Molecular Biotechnology

 

Prof.

 

Eckhard

 

Boles

 

Physiology and Genetics of Lower Eukaryotes

 

Prof.

 

Claudia

 

Büchel

 

Plant Cell Physiology

 

Prof.

 

Volker 

 

Müller

 

Molecular Microbiology and Bioenergetics

 

Prof.

 

Heinz Dieter

 

Osiewacz

 

Molecular Developmental Biology

 

Prof.

 

Gerhard

 

Sandmann

 

Biosynthesis in Plants und Microorganism

 

Prof.

 

Enrico

 

Schleiff

 

Molecular Cell Biology of Plants

 

Dr.

 

Andreas

 

Schlundt

 

mRNA-based gene regulation

 

Prof.

 

Jörg

 

Soppa

 

Biology and Genetics of Procaryotes

 

Prof.

 

Richard

 

Splivallo

 

Biology and Biotechnology of Fungi

 

Prof.

 

Jens

 

Wöhnert

 

RNA Structural Biology

 

Teaching

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Teaching

The Institute is involved the Bachelor's Programmes in Biological Sciences, Biophysics and Bioinformatics as well as in Teacher Education in Biological Sciences and in the biological training of medical science students. In addition, it offers two master's programmes, Molecular Biological Sciences and Molecular Biotechnology, as well as participating in interdisciplinary master's programmes.

Kolloquium

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Kolloquium

Sommersemester 2019

  • Die Vorträge finden jeweils um 17:15 Uhr statt.
    The talks starts at 17:15
  • Ort: Biozentrum auf dem Campus Riedberg, Raum 260/3.13
    Where:  Campus Rieberg, Biocenter, Section of the Building 260 Room 3.13
Di. 07.05.2019 Dr. Christin Naumann
Biozentrum Leibnitz Institute of Plant Biochemistry (IPB)
 

Phosphate Limitation Activates ER Stress-dependent Autophagy in Root Tips

Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is essential for plant growth; however, its availability is often a most limiting factor in soil. In Arabidopsis, Pi limitation reshapes root architecture to favour topsoil foraging by attenuating primary root extension, stimulating lateral root development, and accelerating root hair formation. Primary root growth inhibition correlates with elevated Fe-dependent ROS generation and callose deposition in the root apical meristem and transition zone. Known  proteins acting in the local phosphate response are the ER-resident P5 type ATPase, AtP5A/PDR2, and cell wall-targeted ferroxidases (LPR1, LPR2) which interact functionally and determine the root response to external Pi. Autophagy is an evolutionary conserved process for vacuolar degradation of cellular components and recycling of monomeric building blocks. While a function of autophagy in nutrient recycling is well established under C or N starvation, its role upon Pi deprivation remains to be clarified.

   
Di. 21.05.2019 Prof. Dr. Andreas Moeglich
Biozentrum  Universitat Bayreuth
  Controlling Nucleic-Acid-Based rocesses by Light
   
Di. 28.05.2019 Dr. Nicolai Müller
Biozentrum Universität Konstanz
 

Anaerobic degradation of C1 and C2 compounds via acetaldehyde in the syntrophic acetogen Thermacetogenium phaeum

Degradation of organic compounds in acetogens in many cases occurs through acetyl-coenzyme A as central metabolite, which is funnelled into the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Acetaldehyde is one possible precursor for acetyl-coenzyme A and is especially occurring during oxidation of ethanol or ethanolamine. For the production or degradation of acetaldehyde, various microorganisms harbor two different enzyme systems, namely non-acetylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, which oxidizes aldehydes with ferredoxin as low potential electron carrier, or acetylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, catalyzing oxidation of aldehydes with NAD+ while transferring an acetyl-residue to coenzyme A. Proteome and enzyme assay analysis of the thermophile Thermacetogenium phaeum showed, that aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR), which is a non-acetylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, is highly abundant during degradation of methanol, ethanol, ethanolamine, or syntrophic oxidation of acetate in co-culture with Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus. In all cases, AOR oxidizes acetaldehyde with ferredoxin and the latter is provided for the reduction of CO2. During degradation of these substrates in the model acetogen Acetobacterium woodii a Rnf-complex serves as ferredoxin-reducing enzyme system which catalyses the endergonic oxidation of NADH with ferredoxin at the expense of a sodium ion gradient. Such a Rnf-complex is absent in T. phaeum and here AOR takes over the function of providing reduced ferredoxin. In addition, AOR contributes to high-affinity acetaldehyde turnover thus favouring endergonic oxidation of ethanol. In that way however, acetaldehyde cannot be used for substrate level phosphorylation as in A. woodii. Alternative modes of energy conservation in both organisms are concluded from these findings.

   
Di. 04.06.2019 Prof. Dr. Dina Grohmann
Biozentrum  Regensburg
  Archaeal transcription and the archaeal transcriptome: more complex than we thought
   
Di. 02.07.2019 Dr. Janosch Hennig
Biozentrum EMBL Heidelberg
  Integrative structural biology of protein-RNA complexes

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